elementaryschoolcounselor
elementaryschoolcounselor:

The Hand Washing Lesson
My K-2 students absolutely loved this. The lesson uses lotion-covered hands and glitter to illustrate how germs spread. I placed glitter on one student’s hand and had the student shake hands, high five, and share a pencil with other students, and watching their reactions when they then had glitter (germs) on their hands was great! They then took turns washing their hands, learning just how much effort you should always put into washing your hands to get all of the germs off.
Click through photo for lesson details.

elementaryschoolcounselor:

The Hand Washing Lesson

My K-2 students absolutely loved this. The lesson uses lotion-covered hands and glitter to illustrate how germs spread. I placed glitter on one student’s hand and had the student shake hands, high five, and share a pencil with other students, and watching their reactions when they then had glitter (germs) on their hands was great! They then took turns washing their hands, learning just how much effort you should always put into washing your hands to get all of the germs off.

Click through photo for lesson details.

preschooleducators
preschooleducators:

A suggested way to present a linear flowing programme under the EYLF. Each vehicle represents a learning story reflective of an activity or interaction that has taken place. Condensed versions of the learning stories are written or printed, and added to the display. This makes it easy to have an at-a-glance view of your yearly programme, for parent or assessor review. It’s also a good way to keep track of how you are following up on learning outcomes.

preschooleducators:

A suggested way to present a linear flowing programme under the EYLF. Each vehicle represents a learning story reflective of an activity or interaction that has taken place. Condensed versions of the learning stories are written or printed, and added to the display. This makes it easy to have an at-a-glance view of your yearly programme, for parent or assessor review. It’s also a good way to keep track of how you are following up on learning outcomes.

socalkidsmuseum
socalkidsmuseum:


10 Ways to Create Stimulating Environments for Your Baby or Toddler
 by: Sara Hunsucker, Director of Art Education, SCCM
1.    Rotate your child’s toys often. Keep some on reserve and out of sight, and swap them when your child seems bored with the current selection.  
 2.     Keep toys organized and accessible; the easier they are to grab and engage with, the better!  They will also be easier to clean up.  
 3.     Bring color, light, and sound into play areas.  Safety mirrors, access to windows, art on the walls, and an IPod doc can liven up a space to spark curiosity!
 4.     Create fun new areas for exploration by bringing in pillows, couch cushions, or creating bed sheet forts.  Encourage climbing and crawling in safe areas. 
 5.     Create varied crawling and walking surfaces with bathmats, throw rugs, play mats, foam tiles, and blankets. 
   6.     Include an area for quiet time, such as a reading nook.  If you don’t have space for a rest area, take the child out of the room if over stimulation occurs.  Take cues from your child to know when it is time to change activities like: fussiness or agitation, staring, and disengagement. Return to play actives after a sufficient period of rest or redirected attention, (often 15-20 minutes does the trick). 
  7.     Get down on the floor with them!  Create space for you and/or your caregiver to interact with the child at times.  Inversely, create a space where a child can confidently and safely maneuver alone. Alone time with supervision can build confidence and allow your child explore freely. 
 8.     Stick to age appropriate toys as listed by the manufacturer.  Read instructions for proper use, and to understand how each activity can best benefit your little one’s learning experience.  If something seems like a potential hazard despite the suggested age recommendation, take it out of the mix!  Keep all areas baby/toddler safe and make sure there is always clear access to the door. 
 9.     Encourage a range of different types of play activities such as pretend play/dress up, music time, art time, construction time, etc.  This will help nurture different developmental needs for your child. 
 10. Provide outdoor space for physical movement, mobile toys and ride-along toys, water play, messy art projects, and exploration of nature!  
Brought to you by the Southern California Children’s Museum. visit socalkids.org for more information 
Resource: Kaplan-Sanoff M. 2002. Stimulating environments. In Jellinek M, Patel BP, Froehle MC, eds., 
Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health—Volume II. Tool Kit.Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health

socalkidsmuseum:

10 Ways to Create Stimulating Environments for Your Baby or Toddler

 by: Sara Hunsucker, Director of Art Education, SCCM

1.    Rotate your child’s toys often. Keep some on reserve and out of sight, and swap them when your child seems bored with the current selection. 

 2.     Keep toys organized and accessible; the easier they are to grab and engage with, the better!  They will also be easier to clean up. 

 3.     Bring color, light, and sound into play areas.  Safety mirrors, access to windows, art on the walls, and an IPod doc can liven up a space to spark curiosity!

 4.     Create fun new areas for exploration by bringing in pillows, couch cushions, or creating bed sheet forts.  Encourage climbing and crawling in safe areas.

 5.     Create varied crawling and walking surfaces with bathmats, throw rugs, play mats, foam tiles, and blankets.

   6.     Include an area for quiet time, such as a reading nook.  If you don’t have space for a rest area, take the child out of the room if over stimulation occurs.  Take cues from your child to know when it is time to change activities like: fussiness or agitation, staring, and disengagement. Return to play actives after a sufficient period of rest or redirected attention, (often 15-20 minutes does the trick).

  7.     Get down on the floor with them!  Create space for you and/or your caregiver to interact with the child at times.  Inversely, create a space where a child can confidently and safely maneuver alone. Alone time with supervision can build confidence and allow your child explore freely.

 8.     Stick to age appropriate toys as listed by the manufacturer.  Read instructions for proper use, and to understand how each activity can best benefit your little one’s learning experience.  If something seems like a potential hazard despite the suggested age recommendation, take it out of the mix!  Keep all areas baby/toddler safe and make sure there is always clear access to the door.

 9.     Encourage a range of different types of play activities such as pretend play/dress up, music time, art time, construction time, etc.  This will help nurture different developmental needs for your child.

 10. Provide outdoor space for physical movement, mobile toys and ride-along toys, water play, messy art projects, and exploration of nature! 

Brought to you by the Southern California Children’s Museum. visit socalkids.org for more information

Resource: Kaplan-Sanoff M. 2002. Stimulating environments. In Jellinek M, Patel BP, Froehle MC, eds.,

Bright Futures in Practice: Mental Health—Volume II. Tool Kit.Arlington, VA: National Center for Education in Maternal and Child Health